About your Search

20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the washington post website and martha burke, the money editor of ms. magazine and producer and host of "equal time with martha burke." you look too young to have been there. lynn, i want to ask you what did being there on that important day 50 years ago mean to you as an african-american woman? >> on that day 50 years ago, it was just the most amazing experience i'd ever had in my 16 years. you have to look at it in retrospect, we sometimes see things that you didn't see then, and you have to remember that at the point the people converged on washington, we as a community were off of a very hard fought battle in birmingham, in albany george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in
a lot of the perceptions and the lenses that people are emphasizing for people in real life. martha stewart is often perceived as a woman who is too aggressive and not nice, and even the "b" word used to describe her. and that's totally a gender stereotype. if you had martha stewart as a man, she wouldn't be considered a good business person, and the lens through which people saw different. >> bill, as i was growing up in my adult years there was a snobbery about television, and people wore a badge of honor in the fact that they didn't have a tv set. and you said you were one of those people, but now you've changed your tune, and have written about it, saying that tv may be the signature cultural achievement of america in the 21st century. >> in the last couple of decades, i think it's unquestionable. and that's your point about the emmys and stuff. even if breaking bad gets 20% of the viewers that seinfeld did, it says something about our society when the great artists are working out these problems, right? so you go back to tony soprano, and this is the man who is shot through the
knew we couldn't get back up and i didn't want to drive around. >> reporter: martha and her family had to make a decision, what to save. >> we had to take all our medication. i'm diabetic, and we had to get the cats, weird things that i did, trying to be optimistic, which i should not have been. >> evacuating is stressful. if you leave for an evacuation, you're just sitting there doing nothing worrying about what's happening to your house. >> reporter: goebels chose to stay to protect his home. >> i went out when i smell the smoke and found people to see what was happening, and from what they knew it didn't look like it was going to be a problem unless the win really picked up. >> reporter: but the wind did pick up, and the fire made goebels' choice a necessity. >> i had to stay. the fire was surrounding us, and we were forced to wait for the fuel to burn up enough to allow us to get out. >> reporter: the fire was within a few feet of geobels's house. >> i didn't sleep for 46 hours. >> i always felt that i would be okay because the firefighters, maybe i'm like a 12-year-old, but they'r
certain, martha packed up her belongings and brought her children here. the plan was to get on a bus that would take them the thousand kilometers to south sudan where she was born. she says she thought she would be here a week. that was three years ago. she is still here waiting for that bus along with thousands of others. >> translator: we have no food. i earn about $0.50 a day doing domestic work. i'm waiting for anything to take me back. a truck, a bahs. i would even go by plane. >> reporter: when south sudan gained independence, thousands of refugees lost their citizenship rights and jobs. they were expected to leave. at first the governments of sudan and south sudan supported the cost of transport, but then the money ran out. since the money ran out, those lost in the queue have been stranded here. the terrible conditions they have been living in, have been made worse in the recent flooding, but the help they really want is for the money to 2r5 travel south. >> reporter: in the meantime south sudan has closed the roads. so now they will have to go by plane. the estimated cost fo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)